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Kristine St-Laurent

Government 3.0: Driving a Big Data Ecosystem

Government is well positioned to act as a big data convener and to create new mechanisms and 21st century Crown Corporations to house, receive and manage timely access to combined or “stacked data”.

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Designing 21st Century Skills: Government-Driven Solutions

Recommendations for government as we collectively retool our human capital strategies for the future.

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Punching Above their Weight:
Aboriginal-Owned Businesses

Looking to increase innovation and productivity? Take a leaf from Aboriginal-owned firms, suggests a new study by the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB).

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Tech-tonic Shifts: Supporting the Growth of a BC Tech “Supercluster”

BC is home to a rapidly growing tech sector supported by global anchor firms that, combined, are expanding new digitally-based and mixed reality technologies and firms. Of interest, Vancouver was named in the July edition of Forbes as the number one-start up region in the world, beating out the likes of San Francisco, Berlin, London and Singapore.

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The Struggle is Real

“The struggle is real” is a popular expression used to emphasize the gravity of a frustrating circumstance or hardship. It is also a term recently used by a group of federal government advisors to describe the rapidly changing labour market and the challenges it poses for workers who need to keep pace.

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BC Jobs Part II: A Visual Summary of BC's 2016 Regional Job Performance

In this second part of this series, we take a deeper dive into the labour market and shed some light on the regional dimensions.

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BC Jobs Part I: A Visual Summary of BC's 2016 Job Performance Within Canada

In this first of a two part series of blogs on BC Jobs, we provide an overview of employment growth in 2016 within a comparative national framework.

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A Tale of Two Economies: Leveraging Regional Immigration Strategies to Enhance Growth

The vast majority of new immigrants in BC choose to live in the already capacity-stretched Lower Mainland area. Most other B.C. towns and almost all rural areas attract comparatively few newcomers.

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Mapping Metro Vancouver's Corporate Economy, Part Two: Private Companies

In the first part of our blog series, “Mapping Metro Vancouver’s Corporate Economy,” we examined the biggest publicly-traded companies. This blog considers another facet of the corporate sphere: private companies.

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Mapping Metro Vancouver’s Corporate Economy

Ranking BC-based businesses by annual revenues is one way to develop a better understanding of the nature and make-up of the province’s business community. In this blog, we probe the “corporate economy” of Metro Vancouver by looking at the top 100 public companies in BC, 94 of which happen to be headquartered in Metro Vancouver.

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“I have a master’s degree...but I’m serving sushi.”

Despite hard work and best efforts, the majority of fresh-faced graduates experience a delayed entry into career-oriented jobs, find themselves underemployed—or both. Very rarely are young graduates told what they actually need to be prepared for in the contemporary job market.

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The Generational Erosion of Canada’s Skills Advantage

The youngest generation of Canadian workers is the most educated cohort to date—so why is it that older Canadians are carrying the highest literacy rates relative to international peers?

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Domo Arigato Mr. Roboto: Automation and the Future of Jobs

The way we work is changing. Many traditional jobs that developed over the last century are at high risk of being automated within the next 10 to 20 years. Some recent research suggests nearly 42% of the Canadian labour force may be affected in this way by 2035. The same percentage, 42%, also applies to the proportion of “tasks” performed today by paid employees that could be automated using existing technologies.

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Immigration and Economic Growth

The influx of new immigrants (+86,216) was the primary driver of population growth in the first quarter of 2016. Syrian refugees comprised a large proportion of the incoming immigrant flow. Notably, Canada has never before admitted as many immigrants within a single quarter.

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Linking the Education System with the Changing Nature of Work

The Canadian education system is struggling to keep up-to-date with a dynamic and unsettled economic landscape and the prospect of disruptive transformations in the job market.

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The Importance of Raising Narwhals

Canada’s lacklustre ability to produce high-growth firms is concerning. This should be a foremost concern for policymakers, especially in light of recent gains in access to capital.

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Millennial Musings: A Policy Response to an Aging Population

While increased life expectancy is a positive development, it inevitably translates into additional strain on health and social service budgets. As the number of retirees increase, there will be fewer working-age taxpayers to provide the government revenues needed to pay for services. On top of this, a shrinking natural birthrate is also contributing to a more slowly-growing labour force.

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Three Quick Lessons for Driving Innovation in Canada

Many scholars and business analysts would agree that the U.S. does it right when it comes to supporting technology and innovation. Here are three key lessons from the 2016 Economic Report of the President to help improve Canada’s lacklustre performance on innovation.

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Trends in Metro Vancouver Employment Growth by Industry Over 2001-2015

Over the last fifteen years retail/wholesale trade has consistently remained the leading industry in Metro Vancouver, measured by the number of jobs. Since 2008 health care and social assistance has added 40,500 jobs, and it continues to be the second biggest provider of employment in the region, expanding in tandem with an aging population.

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Growing Forward: Cultivating Productivity in BC’s Agrifood Supply Chain

The combination of $12B in annual revenue (in 2015) from the mix of agrifood-related activities collectively represents a sizeable contribution to the provincial economy. As for employment, the entire agrifood supply chain supports more than 300,000 jobs, although the bulk of these are in the retail/wholesale and food and beverage segments of the sector.

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